Urban Bicycles Posts

8 Best Fixed Gear Bikes Under $500 | Cheap Fixie Reviews

The best fixed gear bikes on a budget

Fixies on the Cheap: Affordable Ride Reviews for 2018

The first time I saw a fixie, I thought, “That is one beautiful bike.” I instantly loved the clean chain line, the minimalist approach.

Fixed gear bikes are everywhere, and they’re here to stay. I can’t remember the last time a bicycle style has hit the scene so hard. Riders everywhere are getting into the simplicity and visceral experience of riding without gears or a freewheel (or, in some cases, brakes!)

One gear, one speed, it’s a blast.

The good news is they’re very affordable. The bad news is that, because they’ve become so popular, there’s a lot of cheap junk on the market — nameless brands made from garbage components.

So what are the best fixed gear bikes on a cheap budget?

I’ve been building them professionally (not to mention riding them) for years now, so I feel qualified to review eight of the top, affordable fixed gear bicycles for sale today. I’ll give a brief overview of the components, the build quality, and what you can expect.

As for price range, we’ll be specifically looking for the best fixed gear bikes below $500.

Hopefully by listing the pros and cons of each ride, you’ll find a top quality fixie for a cheap price! Read on. 

Montague Crosstown Review: Can a Full-Sized Folding Bicycle Compete?

Review of Montague's Crosstown

Crosstown Reviewed: A good quality, full-sized, folding hybrid bike

I, like many other people around the world, often curse at my bicycle. I do it when the chain falls off. I do it when I get a flat.

But more than anything else, I curse whenever I have to haul my full-sized bicycle through the heavy, swinging door of my cramped bicycle room.

The door invariably slams shut the moment I let go. If I don’t yank my bike out of the way in time, crunch. I mean, who designs these things?

Frankly, I love commuting by bike, and I wouldn’t give it up. But wouldn’t it be so much easier if a bike could fold up?

Well guess what? They do. Full-sized, full-featured road, mountain and commuter bicycles that fold up exist, and they’re a lot better than you might expect.

Montague is a bicycle company with a full lineup of cleverly designed folding bikes, all featuring full-sized frames. They’re stylish, they feature modern components, and they fold up small enough to fit in the trunk of your car, or the back of your closet.

Intrigued? So was I. So I set out to review the Montague Crosstown commuter bicycle. Spoiler alert: it’s probably the best full-sized, folding commuter bicycle I’ve ever come across.

8 of the Best Hybrid Bikes Under $500 | Commute Frugally

Affordable Hybrid Bikes Under $500

Finding a road worthy, top quality hybrid bike for under 500 bucks

Ah, the hybrid bike. It’s probably the best thing to happen to the cycling industry in 50 years. Nothing targets the casual / commuter rider quite like it.

And that’s for good reason. Hybrid bicycles (theoretically) offer a wonderful balance of capability.

Road, grass, trails, what’s your pleasure? The hybrid bike handles them all with ease. Right?

Err… not exactly.

While there are some phenomenally great entrants into this category, they’re not all made equal.

The best hybrid bikes under $500 are a good blend of two styles of riding, capable (but not brilliant) at both styles. The worst hybrids out there aren’t really good at any type of riding.

So how does one find a stud in amongst all the duds?

I will be offering a few reviews of some affordable, top quality hybrid bikes below the $500 price point, explaining why each one made the cut, and what kind of riding it’s best suited towards.

Furthermore, I’ll offer a few tips on how to shop for them, and how to better understand hybrids and their various denominations.

Let’s get started!

The $1000 Cyclocross Bike Review Showdown: 5 Best Options

Cyclocross Bike Race

Can You Get A Race Worthy Cyclocross Bike For $1000?

Cyclocross racing is one of the fastest growing sports in North America and across parts of Europe. Merging the speed of road racing with the handling technique of mountain biking, it offers an exhilarating way to spend fall and winter once the mercury starts to drop.

Cyclocross bikes are extremely versatile. They can be used as a thoroughbred racing machine through winter, yes, but their adaptability means that you could fit some fenders and some road tires to use one for comfortable, quick commuting. Alternatively, you could fit a rack and head off touring with minimal additional investment.

In other words, they’re a great bicycular investment.

We’re going to take a look at some of the best low-cost cyclocross bikes around the $1000 price mark, which represents the lower end of the marketplace. With a fair selection of different options (depending on rider preference and individual style), it should be possible to pick up a bargain.

This review will focus on Internet retailer Nashbar’s Steel cyclocross offering which features an impressive Shimano 105 groupset ($849 at time of review), Diamondback’s Haanjo ($900) featuring a flat bar and aluminum frame, Tommaso’s Bestia with Tiagra groupset and excellent price ($849), Raleigh’s Furley singlespeed cyclocross bike ($799) which features disc brakes for reliable stopping, and the Redline Conquest ($1089) which features a performance orientated aluminium frameset.

This review will focus on whether the bikes are tailored towards cyclocross racing and if $1000 can buy you a race-worthy cyclocross bicycle for beginners or those on a budget.

What are the Top 4 Bikes for Cycle-Commuting to Work?

Finding a Good Urban Commuter Bike

Cycling to work? Here are 4 of the best urban commuter bike styles

Planning to start cycle commuting to work? Good choice! You’ll save money, and you might even arrive faster than by car. Not to mention you’ll skip the need for a cardio workout each day. Commuting to work by bicycle has so many upsides; some employers are even incentivizing it.

However, if you’re planning to start cycling to work, be careful! If you ride the wrong type of bike, your adventures in two-wheeled transportation will be short lived.

And trust me, your rusty old beach cruiser or department store mountain bike just won’t cut it. Especially if you’re riding it five times per week! Don’t believe me? Try it.

If you want to stick with it, it is essential to pick the best possible urban commuter bike for your daily trip to work. Just as you’d invest in your car, you should do the same with your bike. It will pay dividends!

So what’s the best bike for cycle commuting anyway? That’s the question I’ll be tackling in this article. Rather than look at specific models, I think it’s best to look at specific bicycle categories.

So we’ll check out four great bicycle styles that are very nicely suited to your daily commute. And within each style I’ll offer a review of a great commuter bike example to investigate.

What about styles to avoid, common mistakes and red flags? You bet! I’ll cover that too.

Top Three Vintage Retro Style Bicycles To Check Out

Vintage Style Bicycles: What's For Sale?

Affordable Vintage Style Bicycles: What’s for Sale Today?

There is nothing more satisfying that cruising on a beautifully restored vintage style bicycle. A true throwback beauty is classic, timeless and gets tons of looks. The only problem? A genuine vintage or antique bicycle costs a fortune these days!

If you’re a fan of vintage style bikes like me, but you have a limited budget, you are in luck. This style is crazy popular and brands are paying attention, so there are many beautiful rides available in a gorgeous vintage style, and they’re brand new.

Mimicking the lines and features of cycles from days gone by, old style bikes are making a real comeback. It makes sense: people long for a time when life was simple, when carbon fibre and cell phones didn’t exist, and when a bike frame had a classic geometry and minimalist good looks.

Here’s the problem though: because the retro style bicycle frame is so popular, everyone and their dog is jumping on the bandwagon, including manufacturers good and bad.

The difference between a home run and a strike? It’s all in the details!

This article will be taking a close look at a handful of my favourite vintage-style bicycles for sale today. Primarily, I want to point you to a ride that not only looks amazing, but functions beautifully too.

How to Restore a Bicycle | Beautiful Vintage Bike Tips

Restored Vintage Bicycle

The human eye is a remarkable thing. It can pick up on incredibly subtle details, and your brain transforms those signals into snap judgements. In the case of bicycles, the eye can pick out imperfections like a magnet.

Rust, scuffed and scratched paint, shoddy or worn out components: all are identified almost immediately. If you’re here to learn how to restore a vintage bicycle, I have some good news for you: I know how to trick the eye.

Performing a beautiful vintage bicycle restoration isn’t always a trial. You don’t always have to tear it down and start from scratch.

There are a few simple and quick ways to restore your vintage bike and make it look like a million bucks (or at least several hundred). Curious? Keep reading. 

Vintage Bicycle Restoration | Finding a Gem

The Peugeot bicycle leaned against the moss covered shed. Its owner stood behind me as I brushed a decade worth of leaves and pine needles off the frame. “I don’t know if it even still works,” she said.

That was an understatement. Orange rust speckled the frame and chrome. One wheel was detached and lay forlornly on the damp earth.

The tires were nothing but bare vinyl and wire: probably the same set that came with it 40 years ago. The brake cables had fused with their housings. They would have to be cut.

I asked what she wanted for it. “A hundred,” she said, a Hail Mary offer based on my unexpected interest. “Nope,” I said, “Fourty, max.” I pointed out various disintegrating components. We agreed on sixty.

As I loaded it up, I smiled. After a haircut and a shave, I’d sell this beautiful bike for $150, easily. Where she saw junk, I saw potential.

How do we distinguish between the rust bucket and the hidden gem? How do you determine if a vintage bike project is ‘too far gone’?