Road Posts

Reviewed: 8 Great, Entry Level Road Bikes | $1000 & Under

Sunny road bicycle ride

Eight of the Best Quality Road Bikes Below $1000

It wasn’t that long ago that spending less than $1000 on a road bike was the domain of commuters looking to find a cheap ride into work. The market has changed dramatically since, and the $1000 range is now becoming a very competitive price point.

There’s a lot of value to be found. This piece is written to help you find a good road bike at or below $1000. We’ll be reviewing each one, mentioning the style of riding it’s suited for, and any other concerns worth noting.

This article is part of a series on entry level road bikes. Stay tuned for the next piece, which will explore the $1500 price range!

5 Good, Cheap Full Carbon Road Bikes | $2000 & Under

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What Are The Cheapest Carbon Road Bikes Worth Riding?

Carbon fibre entered the cycling scene with a bang. It’s a material that has been heralded as being incredibly strong and light, something that road cyclists are always on the hunt for.

In fact, carbon is at least 10 times stronger than steel. Hard to believe, yet true!

The downside to this amazing material is the expense. Since the product is far more labour intensive to produce, it pushes up the price of finished bikes.

Here’s the good news: the technology is now more mainstream, and cheap carbon fibre road bikes are arriving.

8 Best Fixed Gear Bikes Under $500 | Cheap Fixie Reviews

The best fixed gear bikes on a budget

Fixies on the Cheap: Reviews & Advice for 2017

The first time I saw one, I thought, “That is one beautiful bike.” The clean chain line, the minimalist approach.

Fixed gear bikes are everywhere, and they’re here to stay. I can’t remember the last time a style has hit the scene so hard. Riders everywhere are getting into the simplicity and visceral experience of riding without gears or a freewheel (or, in some cases, brakes!)

One gear, one speed, it’s a blast.

The good news is they’re very affordable. The bad news is that, because they’ve become so popular, there’s a lot of cheap junk on the market — nameless brands made from junk components. So what are the best fixed gear bikes on a cheap budget?

I’ve been building and riding them for years now. I’m going to review eight of the top, affordable fixed gear bicycles for sale today. I’ll give a brief overview of the components, the build quality, and what you can expect. We’ll be specifically looking for the best fixed gear bikes below $500.

Hopefully by listing the pros and cons of each ride, you’ll find a top quality fixie for a cheap price! Read on. 

A Road Cycling Tour of the Best Places to Visit in Sherwood Forest

Liam cycling past Sherwood Nature Reserve

Liam Hallam Rides Through the Home of Robin Hood

Many visitors to Nottingham and the surrounding area are surprised at the area that Sherwood Forest covers. Back in the times of Robin Hood, Little John and Maid Marion, Sherwood Forest would have been a dense woodland a third of the size of modern day Central London. It passes from the North of Nottingham, past the Industrial town of Mansfield and up to Worksop in the North.

Now the forest still takes up a huge section of the Nottinghamshire countryside and offers some fantastic cycling routes for both road cyclists and mountain bikers.

It is an amazing place to ride for cyclists: a picturesque setting, with plenty of historic stops along the way. The roads are quiet, fun and challenging, and the setting must be seen to be believed.

We took a few photographs on a recent ride though. Is Nottingham forest really one of the most beautiful places on earth? Read on and find out!

Cycling to Work? 3 of the Best Urban Bikes for Commuting

Finding a Good Urban Commuter Bike

3 of the Best Urban Commuter Bike Styles to Consider

Planning to start cycle commuting to work? Good choice! You’ll save money, and you might even arrive faster than by car. Not to mention you’ll skip the need for a cardio workout each day. Commuting to work by bicycle has so many upsides, and many employers are even incentivizing it.

But be careful! If you ride the wrong type of bike, your adventures in two-wheeled transportation will be short lived. Your rusty old beach cruiser or department store mountain bike will get pretty frustrating if you’re riding it five times per week!

Picking the best possible urban commuter bike is essential to sticking with it. Just as you’d invest in your car, you should invest in your bike. It will pay dividends!

So what’s the best bike for commuting anyway? That’s the question I’ll be tackling in this article. We’ll check out three great bicycle styles that are, in general, well suited to your daily commute.

Within each style, I’ll offer a review of a great commuter bike and brand to investigate.

What about bicycle styles to avoid? You bet! I’ll cover that too.

How to Restore a Bicycle | Beautiful Vintage Bike Tips

Restored Vintage Bicycle

The human eye is a remarkable thing. It can pick up on incredibly subtle details, and your brain transforms those signals into snap judgements. In the case of bicycles, the eye can pick out imperfections like a magnet.

Rust, scuffed and scratched paint, shoddy or worn out components: all are identified almost immediately. If you’re here to learn how to restore a vintage bicycle, I have some good news for you: I know how to trick the eye.

Performing a beautiful vintage bicycle restoration isn’t always a trial. You don’t always have to tear it down and start from scratch.

There are a few simple and quick ways to restore your vintage bike and make it look like a million bucks (or at least several hundred). Curious? Keep reading. 

Vintage Bicycle Restoration | Finding a Gem

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The  Peugeot bicycle leaned against the moss covered shed. The owner stood behind me as I brushed a decade worth of leaves and pine needles off the frame. “I don’t know if it even still works,” she said.

That was an understatement. Orange rust speckled the frame and chrome. One wheel was detached and lay forlornly on the damp earth.

The tires were nothing but bare vinyl and wire: probably the same set that came with it 40 years ago. The brake cables had fused with their housings. They would have to be cut.

I asked what she wanted for it. “A hundred,” she said, a Hail Mary offer, gleaned from my unexpected interest. “Nope,” I said, “Fourty, max.” I pointed out various disintegrating components. We agreed on sixty.

As I loaded it up, I smiled. After a haircut and a shave, I’d sell this beautiful bike for $150, easily. Where she saw junk, I saw potential.

How do we distinguish between the rust bucket and the hidden gem? How do you determine if a vintage bike project is ‘too far gone’?