Cyclocross Posts

Reviewed: 7 Best Entry-Level Road Bikes Under $1000

Sunny road bicycle ride

Seven of the best overall road bikes below the $1000 price point

It wasn’t that long ago that spending less than $1000 on a road bike was the domain of commuters looking to find a cheap ride into work. The market has changed dramatically since then, and the $1000 range is now becoming a very competitive price point.

There’s a lot of value to be found, and fewer compromises than ever before. This piece is written to help you find a good road bike at or below $1000. We’ll be reviewing each one, mentioning the style of riding it’s suited for, and any other concerns worth noting.

This article is part of a series on entry level road bikes. Stay tuned for the next piece, which will explore the $1500 price range!

Mud Tire Duel: Vittoria Cross XL vs. Clement PDX | Cyclocross Reviews

What's the Best Cyclocross Mud Tire?

Get a Grip with the Vittoria Cross XL Pro & Clement PDX Clincher Tires

If you’re racing cyclocross this winter, you are pretty much assured that you’re going to encounter some mud. Whether it’s the thick heavy stuff like riding through peanut-butter that severely slows you down, or the ultra-soft watered down stuff that literally ends up everywhere, it’s tough to ride through.

At some point during the season the hard-packed ground of early season will turn to a form of gloop and as a rider you need to be prepared.

One of the easiest ways to prepare for the conditions is picking up some mud-specific cyclocross tires.  Generally there are three kinds of cyclocross racing tires: dry conditions, all-around performance and mud-specific tires.

It’s logical for a racer using clincher wheels to have a selection of tires at their disposal throughout the racing season.

Two of the more recent additions to the clincher cyclocross tire market are Vittoria’s Cross XL Pro and the Clement PDX. Both tires aim to target the muddier end of the CX racing season.

But will they help you power your way to better performance, or leave you sliding in the mud? To give you an idea of our comparison of these tires we’ve given a running scorecard for you to judge how each cyclocross tire performs.

Which of these two cyclocross mud racing tires is the best for winter riding conditions? Read on to find out.

The $1000 Cyclocross Bike Review Showdown: 5 Best Options

Cyclocross Bike Race

Can You Get A Race Worthy Cyclocross Bike For $1000?

Cyclocross racing is one of the fastest growing sports in North America and across parts of Europe. Merging the speed of road racing with the handling technique of mountain biking, it offers an exhilarating way to spend fall and winter once the mercury starts to drop.

Cyclocross bikes are extremely versatile. They can be used as a thoroughbred racing machine through winter, yes, but their adaptability means that you could fit some fenders and some road tires to use one for comfortable, quick commuting. Alternatively, you could fit a rack and head off touring with minimal additional investment.

In other words, they’re a great bicycular investment.

We’re going to take a look at some of the best low-cost cyclocross bikes around the $1000 price mark, which represents the lower end of the marketplace. With a fair selection of different options (depending on rider preference and individual style), it should be possible to pick up a bargain.

This review will focus on Internet retailer Nashbar’s Steel cyclocross offering which features an impressive Shimano 105 groupset ($849 at time of review), Diamondback’s Haanjo ($900) featuring a flat bar and aluminum frame, Tommaso’s Bestia with Tiagra groupset and excellent price ($849), Raleigh’s Furley singlespeed cyclocross bike ($799) which features disc brakes for reliable stopping, and the Redline Conquest ($1089) which features a performance orientated aluminium frameset.

This review will focus on whether the bikes are tailored towards cyclocross racing and if $1000 can buy you a race-worthy cyclocross bicycle for beginners or those on a budget.